Gut microbiome and alcohol

As we continue to explore the world of gut health, research is uncovering new insights about alcohol and its effects on the gut microbiome.

Although human data is limited, recent studies highlight the importance of various changes in the intestinal microbiota related to alcohol.

For example, one study showed that people drinking an occasional glass of red wine may lead to increased microbial diversity, compared to those drinking an occasional glass of other alcoholic beverages 4. Conversely, another study showed that alcohol-dependent patients with liver disease had a much lower microbial diversity than those without liver disease 3.

Interested to know your personal microbial diversity level? Learn more with Insight™.

To find out more about the gut microbiome and alcohol, explore the following scientific resources.

Science digests and blogs

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Academic

Engen et al. .
The Gastrointestinal Microbiome: Alcohol Effects on the Composition of Intestinal Microbiota. .
Alcohol Research 37:223-236. 2015.

Leclercq et al.
The gut microbiota: A new target in the management of alcohol dependence? .
Alcohol 74:105-111. 2016.

Leclerq et al..
Intestinal permeability, gut-bacterial dysbiosis, and behavioral markers of alcohol-dependence severity. .
PNAS Oct 2014.

Dubinkina et al..
Links of gut microbiota composition with alcohol dependence syndrome and alcoholic liver disease..
Microbiome 5:141. 2017.

Le Roy et al. .
Red Wine Consumption Associated With Increased Gut Microbiota α-diversity in 3 Independent Cohorts..
Gastroenterology S0016-5085(19)41244-4. 2019.

Wang et al. .
Intestinal REG3 Lectins Protect against Alcoholic Steatohepatitis by Reducing Mucosa-Associated Microbiota and Preventing Bacterial Translocation. .
Cell Host & Microbe: 19:227-239. 2016.

Temko et al. .
The Microbiota, the Gut and the Brain in Eating and Alcohol Use Disorders: A ‘Ménage à Trois’? .
Alcohol and Alcoholism 52:403-413. 2017.